Collections

The Mütter Museum has a unique collection of specimens and objects that reflect the human history of anatomy and medicine. Our collection ranges from seventh century BCE to 2014, although the majority of our collection dates from the mid-19th century to the early 20th century. 

Our collection consists mainly of human specimens and medical objects, although we do have some non-human specimens. The Mütter Museum still collects objects and specimens that conform with our Collections Management Policy. For more information on donating to the Museum collection, see our FAQ.

For more on the types of collections we have at the Museum, visit the pages below.

Wet Specimens

Wet specimens are biological samples preserved in a fluid, usually a solution of alcohol and water. Some of our wet specimens date from the early nineteenth century and are still in their original fluid and container.

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Osteological (Skeletal) Specimens

These specimens are articulated (assembled) skeletons or individual bones. Osteological specimens demonstrate both normal human anatomy as well as a variety of skeletal pathologies.

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Models

The Museum has a collection of more than 450 anatomical models. They are made from a range of materials, such as wax, papier mâché, plaster and wood.

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Instruments

The Mütter Museum has more than 5,500 types of medical instruments and apparati spanning centuries and illustrating the advances made in medicine and science.

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Other Collections

The Mütter Museum also features a number of other smaller collections, ranging from dried specimens to historical medical photographs.

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The Mütter Museum helps the public appreciate the mysteries and beauty of the human body while understanding the history of diagnosis and treatment of disease.

  • 19 S 22nd Street
  • Philadelphia, PA 19103
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  • Monday through Sunday
  • 10am–5pm
  • We are closed on Thanksgiving, December 24, December 25 and January 1